5 easy ways to combat common winter ailments

We don’t know about you – but we’re totally ready for summer here at OrthoSole HQ!

The cold snap seems to have lasted an age. And, like most of you, we’ve been subjected to our fair share of coughs, colds and sore throats ever since the weather took a turn a few months ago.

It’s a bad time of year for our general health and wellbeing, too. There’s no getting away from the fact that some health problems are triggered or exacerbated by the colder weather. Widespread illnesses (like the common cold) will usually go away on their own with a little rest and recuperation, but there are some conditions that can significantly worsen during the winter.

Here, we’ve listed five simple ways to combat common winter ailments and stay fighting fit during the chillier months. Prevention is better than cure, after all!

Stay active

It can be tough to find the motivation to exercise in the winter. When it’s cold, wet and windy outside, our natural instinct is to sit in and hibernate – but a lack of physical activity will cause your underused muscle and joints to become stiff and sore (and could worsen conditions such as arthritis and other kinds of joint pain).

Our number one piece of advice is to stay active wherever possible. If you’re not too keen on the idea of a winter walk, head to the gym, or book in for an exercise class that’s going to take place away from the elements. Even small steps, such as taking the stairs instead of the lift, will help to keep your body strong and flexible throughout the year.

Always keep your hands and feet warm

It’s a common misconception that most of your body heat escapes from your head.

In fact, your hands and feet are the main culprits when it comes to heat loss, because they have a larger surface area! This is why it’s especially important to wear cosy gloves, socks and shoes while you’re outside.

Wear loose layers

It may seem counter-intuitive, but wearing loose layers of clothing is key to trapping the heat between the fabric and your skin. Pull on that extra jumper if you’re feeling extra chilly – but if you want to stay warmer for longer, avoid tight, clingy pieces and opt for larger, free-flowing clothes and accessories instead.

Find a pair of warm, comfortable shoes

Shun those flimsy pumps and choose thick, sturdy, watertight footwear instead!

The key is to invest in shoes that are insulating yet breathable. This is because your feet will naturally swell and contract as the temperature changes (ie, when you’re coming back indoors after a long stint in the cold). They’ll need to be equipped with strong grips if you’re going to avoid slips and trips caused by settling snow and ice, too.

And if you’re wearing particularly thick socks in a bid to keep your toes nice and snug, make sure that they’re not causing friction inside your shoes that could lead to blisters and irritation.

Try our insoles!

Believe it or not, winter is the perfect time to try out our customisable insoles and find out for yourself exactly how these products can help to alleviate common aches and pains.

Our shoe inserts won’t just take the pressure off your feet and provide better metatarsal support. They also stabilise the ankle joints, which helps to reduce swelling, aches and cramps in the lower body.

By using our insoles, you’ll enjoy improved foot positioning. This will help to evenly distribute your body weight, which will reduce the amount of stress that’s applied to your knees and your back, lessening the discomfort in these areas.

Plus, our insoles will help to improve circulation in your feet and lower limbs, combating the numbness and tingling sensations that often go hand in hand with poor blood flow in your extremities.

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